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Kodak Retinette IIa - 1959
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• One of Kodak's first semi-auto-exposure cameras

This camera was introduced in 1959, the same year as the Kodak Automatic 35 and Agfa Optima (both in this app), but not in the US.

The Retinette IIa wasn't quite as automatic as the other two, however, because you had to turn a ring to center a needle visible in the viewfinder. The shutter speed was fixed; turning the ring adjusted the aperture. (The instruction manual misleadingly calls it a "shutter ring".) However, since neither the shutter speed nor aperture were marked, the camera was nearly as easy to use as the entirely automatic Kodak Automatic 35 and Agfa Optima.

Retinettes used the same die-cast body units and transport mechanisms as the Retinas, their more-expensive siblings. But Retinettes had cheaper lenses and other parts, so they sold for less.

An interesting feature of the Retinette IIa (shared by other Retinette models) is the depth-of-field indicators, shown in the second photo below, which moved as you changed the exposure ring. This was actually necessary, because the usual method of marking ranges for different apertures couldn't be used, since the Retinette IIa didn't indicate what the aperture was when the needle was centered.

Kodak Retinette IIaKodak Retinette IIa, showing sliding depth-of-field indicatorsKodak Retinette IIaKodak Retinette IIa
Kodak Retinette IIaKodak Retinette IIaRetinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructions
Retinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructions
Retinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructions
Retinette IIa instructionsRetinette IIa instructions

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